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Dog Training

The 8 Best Careers in The Pet Industry

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If you’re passionate about animals, the pet industry might be the perfect place for you to work! There are many different careers to choose from, and each offers its own unique set of challenges and rewards. In this article, we will explore the 8 most popular (and successful) careers in the pet industry.

So, whether you’re just starting out in your career or you’re looking for a change, we guarantee that you’ll find something that interests you!

8 Jobs in The Pet Industry YOU Should Consider This Year!

Career Path #1: Dog Groomer

What Is a Dog Groomer?

A dog groomer is responsible for cleaning, brushing, and styling a dog’s fur. They may also trim the nails and clean the ears.

Is Schooling Required?

In most places, dog grooming is still an unregulated industry. As such, most groomers have at least a high school diploma. That said, getting professional certification training at the start of your career is STRONGLY encouraged!

Approximately How Long Does It Take to Become a Dog Groomer?

This depends on the type of schooling you choose to complete, as well as whether you also wish to complete an apprenticeship. That said, you can easily become a certified dog groomer and begin booking clients in less than 1 year.

What Does a Dog Groomer Do on a Daily Basis?

Dog groomers typically work in pet stores, animal shelters, kennels, or grooming salons. Another popular career path for groomers is to launch and run their own grooming business. In terms of daily job duties, they spend their day bathing, drying, and grooming dogs of all shapes and sizes.

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What Are the Pros and Cons of Being a Dog Groomer?

The pros of being a dog groomer include flexible hours, working with animals, and the opportunity to meet new people every day. The cons include potentially dealing with difficult dogs, having to work on weekends, and dealing with dog hair all day!

Average Salary of a Dog Groomer

The following annual income ranges are based on each country. Please also note that what you wind up making can vary – depending on where you live, whether you work full-time vs. part-time, whether you run your own business or work for an employer, etc.

  • United States: Between approx. $19,000 and $50,000 USD per year (Source: Glassdoor)
    Canada
    : Between approx. $26,000 and $47,000 CAD per year (Source: Glassdoor)
  • United Kingdom: Between approx. £20,600 and £28,600 GBP per year (Source: Talent.com)
  • New Zealand: Between approx. $41,500 and $50,000 NZD per year (Source: Salary Expert)
  • Australia: Between approx. $33,000 and $57,000 AUD per year (Source: Payscale)

Interested in pursuing this career in the pet industry? Become an International Dog Grooming Professional™ (IDGP™) in as little as 9-12 months with QC Pet Studies‘ self-paced, online Dog Grooming Course!

Career Path #2: Veterinary Technician

What Is a Veterinary Technician?

A veterinary technician is a medical professional who works alongside veterinarians to provide animal care. They are responsible for taking X-rays, administering vaccines, and assisting in surgeries.

Is Schooling Required?

Yes – in order to become a certified veterinary technician, you must complete an accredited Veterinary Technician Program.

Approximately How Long Does It Take to Become a Veterinary Technician?

Your professional education will typically take 2 to 4 years to complete. An associate’s degree in veterinary technology is usually around 2 years long, whereas a bachelor’s degree is 4 years long.

What Does a Veterinary Technician Do on a Daily Basis?

The job duties of a veterinary technician vary depending on the type of practice they work in. However, most technicians can expect to spend their day taking X-rays, administering vaccines and medications, drawing blood, and collecting tissue samples.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Being a Veterinary Technician?

The pros of being a veterinary technician include working with animals, having a stable career, and making a difference in the lives of animals. The cons include working long hours, dealing with sick animals, and witnessing animal euthanasia.

Average Salary of a Veterinary Technician

The following annual income ranges are based on each country. Please also note that what you wind up making can vary – depending on where you live, whether you work full-time vs. part-time, your level of experience, etc.

  • United States: Between approx. $28,000 and $48,000 USD per year (Source: Glassdoor)
    Canada
    : Between approx. $37,000 and $54,000 CAD per year (Source: Talent.com)
  • United Kingdom: Between approx. £29,900 and £95,100 GBP per year (Source: Salary Explorer)
  • New Zealand: Between approx. $38,000 and $55,000 NZD per year (Source: Payscale)
  • Australia: Between approx. $46,200 and $72,400 AUD per year (Source: Salary Expert)
Mid section of young male veterinarian doctor carrying a rabbit at medical clinic

Career Path #3: Veterinarian

What Is a Veterinarian?

A veterinarian is a medical professional who diagnostics and treats animals. They are responsible for providing animal care, performing surgeries, and prescribing medications.

Is Schooling Required?

Yes – in order to become a certified veterinarian, you must complete an accredited Veterinary Medicine Program.

Approximately How Long Does It Take to Become a Veterinarian?

Your professional education will typically take at least 4 years to complete. After completing your undergraduate degree, you will then have to complete a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program, which is another 4 years.

What Does a Veterinarian Do on a Daily Basis?

The job duties of a veterinarian vary depending on the type of practice they work in. However, most veterinarians can expect to spend their day diagnosing and treating animal diseases, performing surgeries, and prescribing medications.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Being a Veterinarian?

Much like being a veterinary technician, the biggest benefits of a career in veterinary medicine include working with animals, having a stable career, and making a difference in the lives of animals. Similarly, the cons include working long hours, potentially dealing with sick animals, and witnessing animal euthanasia.

Average Salary of a Veterinarian

The following annual income ranges are based on each country. Please also note that what you wind up making can vary – depending on where you live, whether you work full-time vs. part-time, if you own your own practice, etc.

  • United States: Between approx. $40,000 and $150,000 USD per year (Source: Zip Recruiter)
    Canada
    : Between approx. $54,000 and $102,000 CAD per year (Source: Payscale)
  • United Kingdom: Between approx. £45,100 and £133,000 GBP per year (Source: Salary Explorer)
  • New Zealand: Between approx. $59,000 and $110,000 NZD per year (Source: Payscale)
  • Australia: Between approx. $95,000 and $131,500 AUD per year (Source: Talent.com)

Are you a dog groomer, and need help distinguishing between your role and that of a vet for your client? This article has all the answers you need!

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Career Path #4: Pet Boarding Facility Owner/Operator

What Is a Pet Boarding Facility Owner/Operator?

A pet boarding facility owner/operator is responsible for the care of animals while their owners are away. This can include feeding, walking, and providing general supervision.

Is Schooling Required?

No, there is no formal education required to become a pet boarding facility owner. However, experience working with animals is recommended – and definitely preferred by prospective customers.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Pet Boarding Facility Owner/Operator?

The amount of time it takes to become a pet boarding facility owner varies depending on your prior experience, as well as whether you start your own business or purchase an existing one.

What Does a Pet Boarding Facility Owner/Operator Do on a Daily Basis?

A pet boarding facility owner is responsible for the day-to-day operations of their business. This includes caring for the animals, cleaning the facilities, and managing staff.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Being a Pet Boarding Facility Owner/Operator?

The pros of being a pet boarding facility owner include being your own boss, having a flexible schedule, and working with animals. The cons include long hours, potentially dealing with difficult customers, and having to work on weekends and holidays.

Average Salary of a Pet Boarding Facility Owner/Operator

The following annual income ranges are based on each country. Please note that what you wind up making can vary – depending on where you live, whether you own your own business, etc.

  • United States: Between approx. $21,000 and $73,000 USD per year (Source: Zip Recruiter)
    Canada
    : Between approx. $31,000 and $62,000 CAD per year (Source: Glassdoor)
  • United Kingdom: Between approx. £20,000 and £31,000 GBP per year (Source: Salary Expert)
  • New Zealand: Between approx. $42,000 and $63,000 NZD per year (Source: Salary Expert)
  • Australia: Between approx. $42,000 and $71,000 AUD per year (Source: Payscale)
Empty wooden dog's house with dog food bowl in balcony decorated with houseplant in plant pot.

Career Path #5: Dog Trainer

What Is a Dog Trainer?

A dog trainer is responsible for teaching dogs obedience, tricks, and good manners. They may also work with owners to help them better understand their pets.

Is Schooling Required?

There is no formal education required to become a dog trainer. However, the most successful trainers out there have completed courses and/or certification programs offered by credible, professional organizations.

If you’re interested in becoming a dog trainer, we recommend first obtaining your International Dog Training Professional™ (IDTP™) certification through QC Pet Studies. After that, we highly suggest taking the Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) exam from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers (CCPDT).

How Long Does It Take to Become a Dog Trainer?

The amount of time it takes to become a dog trainer varies depending on your prior experience and whether you complete a certification program. With that in mind, it’s absolutely possible to begin working as a certified dog trainer in less than a year!

What Does a Dog Trainer Do on a Daily Basis?

A dog trainer typically works with a few clients per day, teaching their dogs obedience, tricks, and good manners. In between sessions, they may also be responsible for administrative tasks such as scheduling appointments and updating client records.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Being a Dog Trainer?

The pros of being a dog trainer include working with animals, having a flexible schedule, and being your own boss. The cons include long hours, potentially dealing with difficult customers, sometimes working with stubborn and/or aggressive dogs, and having to work on weekends and holidays.

Average Salary of a Dog Trainer

The following annual income ranges are based on each country. Please note that what you wind up making can vary – depending on where you live, whether you own your own dog training business or work for someone else, how you’ve priced your services, etc.

  • United States: Between approx. $29,000 and $57,500 USD per year (Source: Talent.com)
  • Canada: Between approx. $33,000 and $72,000 CAD per year (Source: Glassdoor)
  • United Kingdom: Between approx. £20,000 and £26,000 GBP per year (Source: Payscale)
  • New Zealand: Between approx. $40,000 and $52,000 NZD per year (Source: Salary Expert)
  • Australia: Between approx. $40,500 and $63,800 AUD per year (Source: Salary Expert)

Become a globally-certified dog trainer by enrolling in QC Pet Studies’ online Dog Training Course today!

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Career Path #6: Pet Food Tester

What Is a Pet Food Tester?

A pet food tester is responsible for, you guessed it, testing pet food! But there’s a little bit more to it than that. Pet food testers work with animal nutritionists and veterinarians to ensure that pet foods meet safety and quality standards.

Is Schooling Required?

While there’s no formal education required to become a pet food tester, having some sort of background in nutrition (especially animal nutrition) would be a MAJOR bonus. This sort of knowledge will allow you to truly thrive in the pet industry, as well as make you a better income.

If you’re interested in becoming a pet food tester, it could be worth it to do a little online research and see what sort of animal nutrition courses are available to you.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Dog Trainer?

The amount of time it takes to become a pet food tester varies depending on your prior experience. It’ll also depend upon whether or not you choose to obtain some sort of nutrition training first. As a point of reference, a bachelor of science degree in either Animal Health and Behavior or Animal Science will take 4 years to complete.

But again, schooling isn’t required in order to work in this field.

What Does a Pet Food Tester Do on a Daily Basis?

A pet food tester typically works with a few clients per day, testing their pets’ food for safety and quality. In between sessions, they may also be responsible for administrative tasks such as scheduling appointments and updating client records.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Being a Pet Food Tester?

The biggest pro of being a pet food tester is that you can play a direct role in ensuring that animals are consuming safe, healthy foods. As you can imagine, the bigger con, on the other hand, is that not all of the foods you test-taste will be pleasant. In fact, some might be downright gag-worthy to your human tastebuds.

Average Salary of a Pet Food Tester

The following annual income ranges are based on each country. Please note that what you wind up making can vary – depending on where you live, whether you own your own business or work for an employer, etc.

  • United States: Between approx. $18,400 and $38,100 USD per year (Source: AnswerstoAll)
  • Canada: Between approx. $24,000 and $48,000 CAD per year (Source: Glassdoor)
  • United Kingdom: Approx. £20,000 GBP per year (Source: Mirror.co.uk)
Pet eating food. Dog and cat eats food from bowl

Career Path #7: Pet Food Manufacturer

What Is a Pet Food Manufacturer?

A pet food manufacturer is responsible for, you guessed it, manufacturing pet food! They work in factories and oversee the production of pet foods from start to finish.

Is Schooling Required?

While there’s no formal education required to become a pet food manufacturer, having some sort of background in nutrition (especially animal nutrition) would be beneficial. This sort of knowledge will allow you to truly excel in the role, as well as increase your employment opportunities and income.

If you’re interested in becoming a pet food manufacturer, it could be worth your while to take an animal nutrition course!

How Long Does It Take to Become a Pet Food Manufacturer?

If you dream of running your own pet food manufacturing business, then it’ll take a little longer than if you’re looking to become an employee of an existing pet food company.

For the latter, the amount of time it takes to become a pet food manufacturer varies depending on your prior experience. It’ll also depend upon whether or not you choose to obtain some sort of nutrition training first.

If you want to start your own business, though, you should expect the process of planning, obtaining funding, and setting up your factory to take a few years.

What Does a Pet Food Manufacturer Do on a Daily Basis?

A pet food manufacturer typically works with other members of the production team to oversee the manufacturing process from start to finish. In between batches, they may also be responsible for quality control tasks such as testing products for safety and nutritional value.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Being a Pet Food Manufacturer?

The pros of being a pet food manufacturer include flexibility (especially if you get to be your own boss), unlimited potential income, constant high demand, and the ability to make a positive impact on the lives of animals. Cons of being a pet food manufacturer include high volume of competition, costly overhead expenses, and having to overcome a definite learning curve.

Average Salary of a Pet Food Manufacturer

Please note that what you wind up making can vary – depending on where you live, whether you operate your own factory or work within someone else’s, your competitors, etc.

The list below provides breakdowns (according to Payscale) of what various roles within a pet food manufacturing company will make per year in the following countries:

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Career Path #8: Dog Walker

What Is a Dog Walker?

A professional dog walker is someone who walks people’s dogs for them while they’re away at work or otherwise unable to do so themselves.

Is Schooling Required?

Nope! No formal education is required to become a dog walker. However, you will need to be comfortable around all sorts of breeds and temperaments of dogs, as well as have the ability to handle more than one at a time.

Plus, you’ll also need some basic knowledge of canine care and safety. For this reason, while not required, we highly recommend taking QC Pet Studies’ self-paced, online First Aid Course!

How Long Does It Take to Become a Dog Walker?

You can pretty much become a dog walker overnight! Just remember that, as with any job, the more experience you have, the more employable you’ll be – and the higher your rates can be.

What Does a Dog Walker Do on a Daily Basis?

A dog walker’s primary responsibility is to, well, walk dogs! This involves visiting clients’ homes to pick up their pups and taking them out for a set amount of time – usually between 30 minutes to an hour.

During this time, the dogwalker will make sure the dog(s) gets plenty of exercise and goes to the bathroom. They may also play games with the dogs or perform other basic obedience commands, depending on the owner’s instructions.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Being a Dog Walker?

The pros of being a professional dog walker include getting paid to hang out with furry friends all day, flexible hours, and the ability to work outdoors. The cons of being a dog walker include having to deal with bad weather, walking in all kinds of neighborhoods, and potentially encountering aggressive dogs.

Average Salary of a Dog Walker

The following annual income ranges are based on each country. Please note that what you wind up making can vary – depending on where you live, whether or not you own your own dog walking business, the number of dogs you can walk per day, whether your business offers any addition services (e.g., dog grooming), etc.

  • United States: Between approx. $20,850 and $48,000 USD per year (Source: Salary.com)
  • Canada: Between approx. $17,000 and $58,000 CAD per year (Source: Payscale)
  • United Kingdom: Between approx. £13,000 and £28,000 GBP per year (Source: Payscale)
  • New Zealand: Between approx. $16,000 and $105,000 NZD per year (Source: Glassdoor)
  • Australia: Between approx. $32,000 and $71,000 AUD per year (Source: Payscale)
Dogs on the streets on leash with smiling man professional dog walker

So, Do Any of These Careers in The Pet Industry Interest You?

Just remember that no matter what your skillset or interests are, there is likely a career in the pet industry that’s perfect for you! If this is your dream job, then don’t let anything stop you from pursuing it!

Do you have any questions or comments about this article? Let us know in the comment section below! And, if you found this article helpful, please share it with your friends!

After all, sharing is caring.

Thanks for reading!

Start YOUR career in the pet industry by enrolling with QC Pet Studies today!

How to Set Your Rates as a Dog Trainer

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As a dog trainer, you may be wondering how to price your services. It can be tricky to find the right price point that will ensure you’re making a good income while still providing a valuable service to clients. In this article, we’ll discuss some tips on how to set your rates as a dog trainer and charge what you’re worth!

Have you read our Ultimate Guide on how to become a dog trainer, even if you don’t have any experience? If not, you can check it out here!

Is a Dog Trainer Worth The Money?

This is a question many clients are going to have before they hire you. They want to know if you’re worth the money they’ll be spending on your services. As a dog trainer, you need to be able to answer this question with a resounding “yes!”

Some factors that will help clients see that you’re worth the investment are:

  • Your experience and reputable qualifications
  • The results you’ve been able to achieve with past clients
  • The value you provide beyond just training dogs (e.g., peace of mind, convenience, etc.)

If you can show potential clients that you’re an expert in your field and that you can provide them with real results, they’ll be more likely to hire you at your desired rate.

Keep in mind that as a dog trainer, you’re not just selling your time. You’re selling your expertise, your results, and your ability to provide a valuable service. When setting your rates, make sure you keep this in mind!

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Where Do Dog Trainers Get Paid The Most?

Just like with any other profession, dog trainers can make more or less depending on where they live and work. In general, dog trainers in urban areas tend to make more than those in rural areas. This is because there are simply more potential clients in densely populated areas.

Of course, your location isn’t the only factor that will affect your income as a dog trainer. Your experience, professional training, qualifications, and results will also play a role in how much you can charge for your services.

Speaking of professional certification training, QC Pet Studies can help YOU become an International Dog Training Professional™ (IDTP™) in less than a year! Check out the course page for our self-paced, online course for the full details!

How Much Does a Dog Trainer Make an Hour?

This is a common question, but it’s not an easy one to answer. As we mentioned before, there are many factors that can affect how much dog trainers make per hour. That said, the average hourly rate for dog trainers in the United States is $20-60.

Of course, you may be able to charge more or less than this, depending on your experience and qualifications. For example, if you’re just starting out as a dog trainer, you may need to charge on the lower end of this range in order to compete with other trainers in your area.

If you have extensive experience and training, however, you could charge closer to $60 per hour without issue. It really depends on your unique situation and what clients are willing to pay in your area.

How Much Does a Dog Trainer Make a Year?

Again, this will depend on factors like experience, qualifications, and location. For example, a dog trainer with many years of experience working in New York City is likely to make much more than a newly certified dog trainer just starting out in a small town.

Owner woman gives a command to her attentive golden retriever puppy on a leash in red lead during the dog training education process in hall with white walls. Dog looks at its owner.

The Average Dog Trainer Salary

That said, here are some up-to-date, average yearly salaries for dog trainers, based on a handful of example countries:

  • United States: Between approx. $21,600 USD and $46,600 USD (Source: Career Explorer)
  • Canada: Between approx. $30,000 CAD and $72,000 CAD (Source: Glassdoor)
  • United Kingdom: Between approx. £20,000 GBP and £26,000 GBP (Source: Payscale)
  • New Zealand: Between approx. $41,500 NZD and $53,100 NZD (Source: Salary Expert)
  • Australia: Between approx. $40,600 AUD and 63,800 AUD (Source: Salary Expert)

Again, just keep in mind that what you make could ultimately vary. Realistically, you could make more than the highest end of the above spectrum in your area if you’re experienced, in-demand, and know how to market yourself.

How Do I Market Myself as a Dog Trainer?

Great question! You’ll need to do more than just put up a few flyers and post on social media if you want to be successful as a dog trainer.

Like with any other business, you’ll need to put in the time and effort to market your services if you want people to actually hire you. This means actively reaching out to potential clients, networking, and making a name for yourself in the industry.

Here are some tips:

  • Get involved with local dog groups or clubs. This is a great way to network with other dog trainers and owners in your area, and it can help you get your name out there.
  • Attend local pet fairs or events. You can promote your dog training services at these events by setting up a booth or handing out flyers.
  • Use social media to your advantage. Posting helpful tips and articles related to dog training is a great way to attract potential clients and show off your expertise.
  • Get involved with online forums and communities. There are many dog trainer groups and forums online where you can connect with others in the industry, share advice, and promote your services.
  • Invest in paid advertising. Online ads are a great way to get your name out there to your target audience. We recommend focusing on Google Ads, Facebook Ads, Instagram Ads, and TikTok Ads.
  • Do some pro bono work. Offer to train a local shelter dog or help out a friend with their dog’s behavioral issues. This will give you some real-world experience, and it can also help you build up your portfolio.

How To Set Your Rates as a Dog Trainer

Now that you know all the basics, it’s time to start setting your rates as a dog trainer! Here are a few things to keep in mind:

Tip #1: Do some research on average hourly rates in your area.

This will give you a good starting point for pricing your services! Remember: you don’t want to go too low, as this can give customers the impression that you aren’t top-quality. On the flip side, you don’t want to go too high either, as this could alienate potential clients and drive them to a different business.

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Tip #2: Consider your experience and qualifications when setting your rates.

If you’re just starting out, you may want to charge on the lower end of the spectrum. If you have extensive experience and training, however, you could charge closer to $60 per hour without issue.

Tip #3: Don’t be afraid to adjust your rates as needed.

If you find that you’re not getting enough clients at your current rate, consider lowering it. Conversely, if you’re in high demand, you may want to raise your rates.

Tip #4: Offer discounts for multiple sessions or package deals.

This can help entice potential clients to hire you, and it can also help you earn more money in the long run.

Tip #5: Offer incentives for returning customers, such as a referral bonus.

This is a great way to show your appreciation for loyal customers, and it can also help you attract new clients!

Tip #6: Be flexible with your payment options.

Some dog owners may not have the money to pay for your services upfront. In these cases, you may want to consider offering a payment plan or accepting credit cards.

Golden Retriever Jumping Through a Tire

How To Charge as a Dog Trainer: Hourly vs. Flat Rate

Now that you know how to set your rates, it’s time to decide whether you want to charge by the hour or by the session. There are pros and cons to both pricing models, so it’s important to weigh your options before making a decision.

Hourly Rate:

Pros:

  • You can adjust your rate based on the difficulty of the training session.
  • You’re paid for your time, regardless of whether the training is successful.
  • This pricing model is more transparent for clients, as they know exactly how much they’ll be paying.

Cons:

  • You may end up spending more time with some dogs than others, which can cut into your profits.
  • Some clients may be hesitant to pay an hourly rate, as they feel like they’re being “charged by the minute.”
  • Moreover, some clients might be hesitant to pay an hourly rate because they worry they won’t get their money’s worth if the training isn’t successful.

Flat Rate:

Pros:

  • You’ll know exactly how much you’re going to earn for each training session.
  • This pricing model is more straightforward for clients, as they know the total cost upfront.
  • A flat rate fee can also be more attractive to clients, as they feel like they’re getting a “deal.”

Cons:

  • If a training session ends up being longer than expected, you won’t be able to make more money.
  • Additionally, if a training session is particularly challenging, you may feel like you’re not being fairly compensated.
  • Some clients may feel like they’re being “ripped off” if the training is successful and doesn’t take very long.

Ultimately, whether you choose to charge by the hour or per session is entirely up to you. There is no right or wrong answer, so it’s important to choose the pricing model that makes the most sense for your business.

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How To Price Dog Training Services: Group Classes vs. Private Lessons

Lastly, you’ll need to decide whether you want to offer group classes or private lessons. Again, there are pros and cons to both options. So, it’s important to choose the one that best fits your preferred business model.

Group Classes:

Pros:

  • You can earn more money by teaching multiple dogs at once.
  • Group classes are often more affordable for clients, which can help you attract new customers.
  • This pricing model is less time-consuming than private lessons, as you’re teaching multiple dogs at once.

Cons:

  • Some dogs do better in a one-on-one setting, which means they may not get the attention they need in a group class.
  • If a dog is misbehaving in a group setting, it can be disruptive for the other dogs (and their owners).
  • Additionally, group classes may not be as profitable as private lessons, as you’re earning less money per dog.

Private Lessons:

Pros:

  • You can give each dog the individual attention they need.
  • This setting is often more comfortable for both the dog and the owner.
  • Private lessons are typically more profitable than group classes, as you’re earning more money per dog.

Cons:

  • You can only work with one dog at a time, which means you’ll need to schedule more training sessions to earn the same amount of money.
  • Some clients may not be able to afford private lessons, which can limit your potential customer base.

Like the potential that group classes and private lessons both offer? Not sure how to choose one over the other?

You don’t have to!

In fact, many dog trainers offer both group classes and private lessons. This way, you can attract a wider range of clients while still being able to offer the services that best fit each individual dog’s needs.

Young woman training her little dog, cocker spaniel breed puppy, outdoors, in a park.

Conclusion

When it comes to setting your rates, there is no “right” way to do things. You’ll need to decide what type of pricing model makes the most sense for your dog training business. And, you’ll need to decide whether you want to offer group classes or private lessons (or both!).

The most important thing is that you’re clear about your prices from the start. This way, you can attract the right clients and avoid any misunderstandings down the road.

Do YOU have any tips about how to set your rates as a dog trainer? Leave your advice in the comments below!

Thanks for reading!

Become an internationally-certified dog trainer by starting your self-paced, online training with QC Pet Studies today!

Should YOU Become a Dog Trainer?

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Should you become a dog trainer? Well, let’s see… Are you an animal lover with a passion for teaching? If so, then this career path may be PERFECT for you!

Dog training is a growing industry that offers many opportunities for both personal and professional growth. It can be very rewarding to help dogs learn how to behave properly and make their owners happy. In this article, we’ll discuss the pros of becoming a dog trainer, provide some background information about this profession, and reveal some tips on how to get started in this exciting field.

So if you’re considering a career change, read on!

Before we dive in, did you know that we’ve written the ULTIMATE guide on becoming a dog trainer, even with no experience? Check it out here!

Should You Become a Dog Trainer?

What Does a Dog Trainer Do?

A dog trainer is responsible for teaching obedience, manners, and behaviors to dogs. This can be done through private sessions, group classes, or even online sessions. Trainers may also work with owners to help them better understand their dogs and how to train them effectively.

Dog trainers typically specialize in a particular area of training, such as puppy training, obedience training, agility training, and more. Some trainers may also offer behavior modification services to help dogs with specific behavioral issues.

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What Qualities Do You Need to Be a Dog Trainer?

So, what does it take to be a successful dog trainer?

First and foremost, you must have a genuine love for dogs. You should also be patient, as training can sometimes be frustrating for both the trainer and the dog. It’s important to be able to stay calm in difficult situations and have a lot of patience.

Next, you must also be able to effectively communicate with both dogs and their owners. This includes being able to understand body language, vocal cues, and energy levels. As a trainer, you’ll need to be able to adjust your teaching style to fit each individual dog’s needs.

Last but not least, you must be willing to continue learning throughout your career. The field of dog training is always evolving, so it’s important to stay up-to-date on the latest training techniques and research.

Do You Need Professional Training to Become a Dog Trainer?

You may be wondering if you need professional training to become a dog trainer. The answer is, it depends.

While there are many successful trainers who are self-taught, it’s not the route we recommend taking. The reason for this is because, completing a professional dog training program can give you the skills and knowledge you need to truly succeed in this field. Professional programs – such as the online program offered by QC Pet Studies – typically include coursework in animal behavior, learning theory, and obedience training.

In addition to formal education, it’s also important to get experience working with dogs. This can be done through volunteering at shelters or rescue organizations, taking on private clients, or working as an assistant at a dog training facility.

Discover how you can become an International Dog Training Professional™ (IDTP™) this year by taking QC’s self-paced, online Dog Training Course!

How Much Do Dog Trainers Get Paid?

The amount of money you make will depend on a number of factors, such as:

  • Your location
  • The type of clients you work with
  • The services you offer
  • Whether you’re employed or self-employed
  • Whether you also offer any additional, complementary services (i.e. dog grooming)
  • Your marketing efforts
  • Your level of experience and professional qualifications
  • Local competition
  • The demand for dog training services in your area, etc.

That said, here are the average annual salaries for dog trainers, based on a few example countries:

  • United States: Between $29,000 USD and $57,500 USD (Source: Talent.com)
  • Canada: Between $33,000 CAD and $72,000 CAD (Source: Glassdoor)
  • United Kingdom: Between £20,000 GBP and £26,000 GBP (Source: Payscale)
  • New Zealand: Between $40,000 NZD and $52,000 NZD (Source: Salary Expert)
  • Australia: Between $40,500 AUD and $63,800 AUD (Source: Salary Expert)

Again, it’s important to remember that where you fall on this scale may vary. But if you’re willing to put in the work and give this career path your all, you can absolutely make a comfortable, full-time living as a dog trainer!

A Border Collie dog playing with its owner on a frisk morning in the park.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Dog Trainer?

The amount of time it takes to become a dog trainer will also depend on a few factors, such as:

  • Your location
  • Whether you complete a professional training program (which, again, we highly suggest doing)
  • How much experience you have working with dogs

However, based on the average length of time it takes to become a fully qualified dog trainer in different countries, we see that it typically falls between 12 months and 36 months.

That said, you could potentially become a certified dog trainer in less than a year! For instance, because QC Pet Studies’ online Dog Training Course is 100% self-paced, YOU get to decide how quickly you can finish your program!

Is a Dog Trainer Worth The Money?

This will be a question that many prospective clients will have prior to hiring you. And frankly, it’s a valid question! After all, there are plenty of free dog training resources available online.

So, why would someone want to pay for your services?

Well, the answer is simple: yes! This is because you offer value that they cannot get from a blog post or YouTube video. You offer a personal touch and customized attention that can help their dog in ways they may not be able to achieve on their own.

In other words, as a professional dog trainer, you have the ability to change lives – both human and canine! And that is an extremely valuable skill!

Pros of Becoming a Dog Trainer

So, what are the real benefits of becoming a dog trainer? Here are just a few…

You get to work with dogs!

This is probably the number one reason why people become dog trainers. And it’s easy to see why! Dogs are amazing creatures that have the ability to brighten even the darkest of days.

As a dog trainer, you get to help dogs and their owners build stronger relationships and create lasting bonds. There’s nothing quite like seeing the joy on a client’s face when they finally achieve success with their dog – and you know you played a role in making that happen!

It can be an extremely rewarding career!

In addition to the feel-good factor that comes with working with dogs, dog trainers also get to experience a great sense of accomplishment and satisfaction from helping their clients achieve their training goals.

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Dog training is always in demand!

There will always be a need for dog trainers! As long as there are dogs, there will be owners who need help training them. This means that, as a dog trainer, you can pretty much guarantee yourself job security for life!

You can make a good living doing what you love!

Last but not least, one of the biggest benefits of becoming a dog trainer is that you can actually make a lot of money doing it!

Of course, the exact amount you can make will depend on a number of factors, such as your location, experience, and the type of clients you work with. However, as seen from the stats listed earlier, it’s definitely possible to make a killer income!

(And that’s not even including the additional income you could potentially make from offering additional services, such as dog walking, dog grooming, pet sitting, or even selling your very own dog training products.)

What Are The Disadvantages of Being a Dog Trainer?

Now that we’ve looked at all of the wonderful benefits of becoming a dog trainer, let’s take a moment to consider some of the potential disadvantages.

Of course, every job has its downsides – and being a dog trainer is no different! Here are a few things to keep in mind:

It can be challenging (but rewarding!) work.

Just like any job, being a dog trainer can be challenging at times.

You will have days where everything goes according to plan and you feel like you’re on top of the world. But you will also have days where nothing seems to go right and you want to pull your hair out.

The key is to remember that, even on the tough days, you are still making a difference in the lives of dogs and their owners. And that is an extremely rewarding feeling!

You need to be prepared for occasional bumps and bruises.

Working with dogs can be a bit dangerous at times!

While most dogs are gentle and loving creatures, there is always the potential for a dog to bite or scratch you – no matter how well trained they are. Of course, this is not something that happens often. Still, it’s important to be aware of the risks before you start working with dogs.

Young family pet dog playing and being treated

You need to have a lot of patience.

Working with dogs can be frustrating at times, especially when you’re first starting out.

Dogs don’t always do what you want them to do – and that can be extremely frustrating! It’s important to remember that every dog is different and will learn at their own pace.

The key is to remain patient and never give up on a dog – no matter how challenging they may be!

So… Should You Work in Dog Training?

Becoming a dog trainer can be an extremely rewarding career! You get to help dogs and their owners build stronger relationships, create lasting bonds, and achieve their training goals. In addition, dog trainers make a good living doing what they love!

Of course, every job has its downsides – and being a dog trainer is of no exception. You need to be prepared for occasional bumps and bruises, have a lot of patience, and be aware of the risks before you start working with dogs.

So…what do you think? Is becoming a dog trainer the right path for you?

Only you can answer that question! But we hope this article has given you something to think about. Thanks for reading!

This year, start your dream career and become a dog trainer by enrolling with QC Pet Studies today!

How to Get Clients as a Dog Trainer

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As a dog trainer, you know that finding clients is essential to your success. So, how can you attract new customers and book more appointments? In this article, we will reveal how to get clients as a dog trainer in 25 innovative ways!

Plus, we’ll also answer some commonly asked questions about the dog training industry. This way, you have a better understanding of what it entails. So, let’s get started, shall we?

WAIT! Before we begin, did you know that we’ve put together the ULTIMATE guide on how to become a dog trainer? It’s true – and you can read it here!

Frequently Asked Questions

Before we reveal how to get clients as a dog trainer, first we’ll answer some commonly asked questions about the dog training industry in general…

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What Qualities Make a Good Dog Trainer?

Patience, creativity, and the ability to think outside the box are essential qualities for any good dog trainer. After all, you’re dealing with animals – and they can be unpredictable!

You must also be able to adapt to each individual dog’s needs. No two dogs are alike, so it’s important that you tailor your training methods accordingly. Finally, having a passion for dogs is non-negotiable! If you don’t love them, this probably isn’t the career for you.

Is It Worth Getting a Professional Dog Trainer?

This is a question that nearly all of your clients will think at one point or another before reaching out to you. And, it’s a valid question!

After all, there are a lot of “how to train your dog at home” guides out there. So, why should they invest in professional help? Is it even worth it in the first place?

Well, the answer is simple: YES! And here’s why – you’re the expert. If you’re serious about dog training as a career, then we assume you’ve put in the time and effort to get properly trained and certified.

As such, you have invaluable experience and industry-level knowledge under your belt. Not to mention, you’re actually qualified to do the job! This gives you an edge that the average person just doesn’t have.

Plus, when clients work with a professional dog trainer, they can be sure that their dog is getting the best possible care. Training experts understand dogs better than anyone – and they know how to get results quickly and effectively.

At the end of the day, it’s up to the client whether or not they want to hire a professional dog trainer. But, we think it’s worth it… And after sitting down with you and hearing the endless advantages, we’re sure they will, too!

Where Do Dog Trainers Get Paid The Most?

This is a great question – and one that we get asked a lot!

But the truth is, there’s no definitive answer. It really depends on your experience level, geographical location, and the types of services you offer. For instance, dog trainers who provide private lessons tend to make more money than those who only offer group classes.

Similarly, dog trainers who work in large cities usually make more money than those in smaller towns or rural areas. This is because there’s simply more demand for their services!

Of course, as with any career, the amount you get paid also depends on your experience level. A new dog trainer just starting out will likely make less than an experienced professional with an established clientele.

That being said, the dog training industry is growing rapidly. So, there’s definitely potential to make good money – especially if you’re willing to put in the work!

feeding food to 2 french bulldogs, black and white puppies, interior studio shot, point of view, reward conditioning training behavior concept

How Do I Grow My Dog Training Business?

There are a few key things you can do to grow your dog training business. First, focus on providing top-notch customer service. This includes being prompt, professional, and courteous at all times – both in person and online.

Make sure you’re always going above and beyond for your clients. After all, they’re entrusting you with their beloved furry friend! If they’re happy with the service they receive, they’ll be much more likely to refer you to others.

Next, focus on marketing yourself effectively. This means creating a strong online presence and using social media to your advantage. Share useful tips and insights related to dog training on your blog or website – this will help attract new readers (and potential clients) to your site.

Finally, don’t forget the power of word-of-mouth marketing! Ask your current clients to leave reviews on popular review sites like Google and Yelp. And, if they’re happy with your services, encourage them to tell their friends and family about you.

How Do I Sell My Dog Training Classes?

Alright, now that we’ve answered some common questions about the dog training industry, it’s time to get down to business! Because we know the real reason why you’re here is that you want to know how to actually attract clients and successfully sell your services to them.

So, here are 25 ways to get clients as a dog trainer…

How to Get Clients as a Dog Groomer in 25 Ways

1. Get Professionally Trained and Certified as a Dog Trainer

If you want to be taken seriously as a dog trainer, you need to get properly trained and certified. This will give you the industry-level knowledge and experience that clients are looking for. Plus, it’ll help you stand out from the competition.

There are a number of ways to get trained and certified as a dog trainer. You can attend workshops, take online courses, or even get a degree in animal behavior. Whichever route you choose, make sure you’re getting qualified by an accredited organization.

This will show potential clients that you’re serious about your career – and that you have the skills to back up your claims!

Did you know that QC Pet Studies offers a self-paced, online Dog Training Course? Discover how YOU can become an International Dog Training Professional™ (IDTP™) in 2022!

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2. Make Sure You Have a Strong Business Brand

Creating a strong business brand is essential for any dog trainer looking to attract clients. Your brand should be professional, unique, and memorable. It should also reflect the values that you want your business to be known for.

For instance, if you’re focused on providing high-quality services, make sure your branding reflects that! Use clean lines and simple colors in your logo and website design. Moreover, make sure your copy is clear, concise, and error-free.

Your branding should also be consistent across all of your marketing materials – from your business cards to your social media accounts. This will help create a cohesive look that potential clients will remember.

3. Put Together a Killer Dog Training Portfolio

If you want to attract clients, you need to show them what you’re capable of! And the best way to do that is by putting together a dog training portfolio.

Your portfolio should showcase your skills and highlight your experience. It should also feature before-and-after photos of dogs that you’ve trained. This will help potential clients see the transformation that’s possible with your help.

4. Create a Website for Your Dog Trainer Business

Having a professional website is essential for any dog trainer looking to attract clients. Your website should be easy to navigate and full of helpful information about your services.

It should also feature high-quality photos and videos from your portfolio. This will help give potential clients a sense of what you’re all about. Furthermore, make sure your site is mobile-friendly! More and more people are using their phones to search for businesses online, so you want to make sure they can easily find you.

Here are a few other things to keep in mind when creating your website:

  • Use keyword-rich titles and descriptions to help potential clients find your site.
  • Include an ‘About Me’ section so people can get to know you.
  • Include testimonials from past clients to show off your successes.
  • Make it easy for potential clients to contact you (i.e. include your email address and phone number on every webpage).
  • Use social media buttons to connect your website with your online following.
  • Offer free resources – like eBooks and PDFs – to show potential clients that you’re an expert in your field.
  • Provide an option for online booking.

Never built your own website before? No problem! This article by WebsiteBuilderExpert will break down everything you need to know!

A mixed-breed poodle at a pet boarding facility

5. Establish Yourself on Social Media

In today’s digital age, it’s essential for businesses to have a strong presence on social media. This is especially true for dog trainers, who can use social media to reach a wider audience of potential clients.

Tips for Maximizing Social Media

When creating your social media accounts, make sure you’re using consistent branding across all platforms. This will help create a cohesive look that potential clients will remember.

Next, once you have your accounts set up, start posting engaging, original content on a regular basis. This could include photos and videos of dogs you’ve trained, tips and tricks for dog owners, and/or behind-the-scenes footage of your training sessions.

You should also make sure to interact with other users regularly. Like and comment on other dog trainers’ posts, and join relevant online communities. This will help you build a network of potential clients – and referrals!

Finally, don’t forget to promote your website on your social media accounts! Include links back to your site in your bio, and make sure to post regular updates about your services. This will help direct the traffic you get on social media to your actual website… Which, in turn, can increase your bookings!

6. Offer Free Training Consultations to Friends and Family

Do you know anyone who’s thinking about getting a dog? Offer to do a free training consultation with them! This is a great way to get your foot in the door, get some real-world experience under your belt, and increase the odds of you being referred to paying clients.

7. Learn About SEO…

…And how you can use it to get clients as a dog trainer!

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of optimizing your website for Google’s search algorithm. Basically, it’s a way to make sure your site appears as high up as possible on the list of results when someone searches for keywords related to your business.

And while SEO can be complicated, there are some simple things you can do to get started. For example, including relevant keywords in your website content will help Google understand what your site is all about. This, in turn, can improve your chances of appearing in relevant search results.

Another easy way to improve your SEO is by creating backlinks – that is, links from other websites back to yours. This helps Google understand that your site is popular and relevant, which can also improve your ranking.

There are a number of other SEO techniques you can use to get clients as a dog trainer. But these are just a few of the basics! For more tips, check out this helpful guide from Moz.

Ultimately, SEO may seem like a lot of work… But it’s worth it when you start seeing an influx of new clients!

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8. Offer a Variety of Dog Training Service Packages

One way to make your dog training business more attractive to potential clients is by offering a variety of service packages. This way, they can choose the option that best fits their needs – and budget.

Some ideas for service packages you could offer include packages for:

  • Puppy owners who want help with potty training and basic obedience commands
  • Adult dog owners who want help with behavior modification
  • Seniors or people with disabilities who need assistance with dog walking or pet care

Of course, these are just a few examples. You can tailor your service packages to fit the needs of your target market! By offering different options, you’re more likely to find clients who are willing (and able) to pay for your services. And that’s always a good thing!

9. Provide Specialty Training Services

Another way to set yourself apart from other dog trainers is by offering specialty training services. This could include anything from agility training and flyball to obedience competitions and search and rescue.

By providing these types of services, you’ll be able to attract clients who are looking for something beyond the basics. And if you’re able to establish yourself as an expert in your field, you’ll be more likely to get referrals from other trainers – or even veterinarians!

So, if you’re looking for ways to stand out from the competition, consider offering some specialty training services. It could be just what you need to get ahead!

10. Know Your Target Market

When it comes to finding clients as a dog trainer, one of the most important things you can do is to know your target market. That is, who are you trying to attract with your business?

Are you looking to train puppies? Or adult dogs? Or both?

Do you want to work with families? Seniors? People with disabilities?

By understanding your target market, you’ll be able to more effectively market your services. And that means you’ll be more likely to find – and book – clients!

Thus, take some time to think about who you want to work with. Once you have a good understanding of your target market, you’ll be well on your way to finding clients as a dog trainer.

Cynologist training sniffing dog on playground

11. Invest in Paid Advertisements

Another great way to find clients as a dog trainer is by investing in paid advertisements. This could include anything from Google Ads to Facebook Ads to print ads in local publications.

Paid advertisements are a great way to reach new people – and they can be very effective if done correctly. However, it’s important to keep in mind that they can also be quite costly. So, if you’re going to invest in paid ads, be sure to do your research first!

If you’ve never created paid ads before, this helpful blog post by Hotmart breaks down a ton of awesome tips for paid advertising on a budget!

12. Get Involved in The Community

One of the best ways to find clients as a dog trainer is by getting involved in the community. This could involve anything from volunteering at local shelters or rescue groups to participating in canine events or fundraisers.

By getting involved in the community, you’ll be able to meet new people – and show them what you’re all about. Plus, that could lead to some great opportunities for finding new clients!

13. Sponsor a Local Event

Another great way to get involved in the community – and find new clients as a dog trainer – is by sponsoring a local event. This could be anything from a dog show to an agility competition to a fundraiser walk/run.

Sponsoring an event is a great way to get your business name out there. And if you choose an event that’s related to your services, you’ll be more likely to attract people who are interested in what you have to offer!

14. Get Veterinarian Referrals

If you want to find clients as a dog trainer, one of the best places to start is with veterinarian referrals. After all, they’re the ones who are most likely to have clients who need your services!

So, how do you go about getting referrals from veterinarians?

Well, one way is to simply ask them! If you have a good relationship with your local vet (or vets), let them know that you’re available to train their clients’ dogs. They may not always need your services, but it’s worth asking!

Another way to get referrals from veterinarians is by participating in continuing education courses. Many times, these courses are offered through veterinary hospitals or clinics. And by taking part in these courses, you’ll not only be able to learn more about your craft – you’ll also be able to network with other professionals in the industry.

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15. Partner With a Pet Store

If you want to find clients as a dog trainer, partnering with a pet store can be a great way to do it! By partnering with a pet store, you’ll be able to reach new people who may not have heard of your business before. Plus, you’ll be able to offer your services in a convenient location for potential clients.

16. Do Some Serious Networking

If you want to find clients as a dog trainer, networking is key. After all, it’s all about who you know!

So, how do you go about networking?

Well, one way is to simply reach out to your network of friends, family, and acquaintances. Let them know that you’re available to train their dogs – or the dogs of people they know. You can also join all sorts of online dog communities, where you may find all sorts of pup parents in need of a professional trainer.

Another great way to network is by attending canine events and meetups, as well as industry conferences and trade shows. This is a great way to meet other dog trainers – and potential clients! – in your area. And don’t forget about making connections with other, similar professions in the dog industry, such as groomers.

17. Offer Complementary Services

Speaking of dog groomers, why not get trained and certified as a groomer yourself and add it to your dog training business?

By offering complementary services, you’ll be able to reach new potential clients who may not have considered dog training before. Plus, it’s a great way to add value to your existing services! You’ll not only be able to add an additional stream of income to your company – you may even be able to slightly raise the rates for your training services, too!

Interested in becoming an International Dog Grooming Professional™ (IDGP™)? Learn all about QC Pet Studies’ online Dog Grooming Course and enroll today!

18. Give Demonstrations

Giving demonstrations is another great way to find clients as a dog trainer. This could involve giving a presentation at a local school or library, or even setting up a booth at a pet-friendly event.

Demonstrations are a great way to show potential clients what you’re all about – and how you can help their dogs! Plus, they’ll also get to see your dogs in action, which is always impressive.

Girl in black and white clothes with black and white dog stafford play on the ground at park outdoor

19. Host Dog Training Seminars/Workshops

If you want to find clients as a dog trainer, one great way to do it is by hosting seminars or workshops. Dog training seminars and workshops are a great way to reach new potential clients – and they’re also a great way to show off your expertise!

Additionally, another option is to offer dog training classes out of your own business. This way, interested clients can follow your personalized curriculum and become dog trainers themselves! Just be aware that this option may require some additional investment, in terms of time and money.

You’ll also want to do a little research first to make sure that you have all of your angles covered legally. Any course you teach and provide any type of certificate/certification for should be properly accredited first, and follow the rules of your city/State.

20. Get Involved With Local Rescue Groups

If you’re passionate about finding homes for dogs in need, getting involved with local rescue groups can be a great way to find clients as a dog trainer.

Many times, these groups are always in need of volunteers – and dog trainers! – to help socialize and train the dogs in their care. Not only will you be helping out a great cause – you may also find your next client (or several) through these groups as well.

21. Get Listed on Online Directories

In today’s day and age, it’s important to have an online presence if you want to find clients as a dog trainer. One great way to do this is by getting listed on online directories, such as Yelp or Google My Business. This will help potential clients find you when they’re searching for dog trainers in their area.

It’s important to make sure that your listings are accurate and up-to-date, and that you have plenty of positive reviews. This will help you stand out from the competition and attract new clients!

22. Get Listed on Google Maps

One of the best ways to make sure potential clients can find you is by getting listed on Google Maps. This will help ensure that your business comes up when people are searching for dog trainers in your area.

It’s important to make sure that your listing is accurate and up-to-date, and that you have plenty of positive reviews. This will help you stand out from the competition and attract new clients!

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23. Teach Group Classes

Another great way to find clients as a dog trainer is by teaching group classes. This could include anything from obedience classes to puppy socialization classes – and everything in between! Not only will teaching group classes help you reach new potential clients, but it’s also a great way to show off your expertise.

Plus, it’s a great way to socialize your own dogs!

24. Create an Email Campaign

If you want to find clients as a dog trainer, one great way to do it is by creating an email campaign. This could involve sending out a monthly newsletter, or even just sending out updates and special offers to your current clientele.

Email campaigns are a great way to stay in touch with your current clients – and reach new ones! Just be sure to create quality content that will appeal to your target audience.

If you’re new to this sort of thing, this article by OptinMonster provides a wonderful step-by-step breakdown on how to run a successful email marketing campaign!

25. Offer Virtual Dog Training Classes, In Addition to In-Person Ones

Finally, another efficient way to find clients as a dog trainer is by offering virtual dog training classes. This could involve anything from webinars to Skype sessions – and everything in between!

Offering virtual dog training classes is a great way to reach potential clients who might not be able to attend your in-person classes. It’s also a great way to show off your expertise! Plus, this will allow you to expand your client reach on a global scale… Which means a LOT more money in your pocket!

Obedient cute smart jack russell terrier dog puppy sitting in the grass on leash and looking up to his owner. Pet obedience training concept.

Conclusion

There you have it – 25 business-savvy ways to find, attract, and book clients as a dog trainer.

Remember: the most important thing is to stay consistent with your marketing efforts, and always be willing to put in the extra work. The payoffs will be more than worth it in the end!

Do YOU have any other tips on how to get clients as a dog trainer? If so, we’d love to hear them! Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below. And be sure to share this article with any fellow dog trainers who might need some help finding clients!

Start your journey towards becoming a professional dog trainer today by enrolling with QC Pet Studies!

How to Start a Dog Training Business

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So, you want to start a dog training business? That’s great! Dog training is a hugely profitable and rewarding industry, and there’s always room for more talented trainers.

In this article, we’ll walk you through everything you need to know in order to start your own successful dog training business from scratch. We’ll cover topics such as how to find clients, what services to offer, how much to charge, and more!

What Qualifications Are Needed to Be a Dog Trainer?

First and foremost, in order to start a dog training business, you’ll need to be an experienced trainer. This means that you’ll need to have a wealth of knowledge about dog behavior, obedience training methods, and how to handle dogs safely.

While you don’t technically need a formal qualification in canine training, it DEFINITELY helps if you do! In fact, by choosing to forego a proper education, you’ll be setting up your career for failure. This is why we believe that the single smartest way to launch a become a thriving trainer is to first start by getting properly trained and certified.

But we’ll get into that more a little later…

In the meantime, you can also check out our Ultimate Guide on becoming a dog trainer for more information about this job path!

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Is a Dog Training Business Profitable?

Absolutely! In fact, the pet industry as a whole is booming, and it’s only expected to continue growing in the years to come. This means that there are plenty of opportunities for dog trainers who are looking to start their own business.

What Do Dog Trainers Charge?

Bark.com published an excellent article on this very topic, so that’s where we’ll draw our information. (Although it’s always worth keeping in mind that the numbers provided are not absolutes! Rather, they’re meant to simply give you an idea of the type of rates you can charge your clients.)

According to this article, the average dog trainer charges $75 per session. Minimum rates can be as low as $30 per session, and higher-end fees can be as much as $120 (or more) a session.

Other Pricing Factors

Furthermore, your rates may be different, depending on the type of class being taught (i.e. single vs. group sessions), the age of the dog(s), how much experience you have, etc. Bark.com reports that the average rate for a group class, for example, is around $40 – whereas a private class charges the client approx. $82.50 on average.

The type of training can also influence your rates, too. For example, you may want to charge a little higher if specializing in aggressive dogs. Similarly, you may want there to be a price difference between puppy training sessions vs. adult dog training sessions.

Most training sessions only last around an hour, so no matter how you choose to structure your pricing, it’ll quickly add up to a healthy income stream. Not too bad, right?

What Do Dog Trainers Do On a Day-To-Day Basis?

As a dog trainer, many of your days will be spent working with a variety of different dogs – each with their own unique personality and set of obedience issues. In other words, no two days on the job will ever be the same!

In addition to teaching obedience classes, you may also find yourself doing things like:

  • Evaluating new dogs to see if they’re suitable for training
  • Consulting with pet parents about their dog’s behavior problems
  • Giving private lessons in people’s homes
  • Working one-on-one with problem dogs at a shelter or rescue organization
  • Conducting canine research projects

Furthermore, if you’re running your own dog training business, you’ll also be responsible for the backend of your operations. This means that you’ll also have to stay on top of:

  • Marketing and advertising your services
  • Managing client bookings
  • Creating invoices/receipts
  • Ordering supplies as needed
  • Bookkeeping and accounting tasks

As you can see, there’s definitely a lot that goes into being a successful dog trainer! Are YOU up for the challenge?

If so, keep reading… we’re about to dive into the 6 steps involved in starting a dog training business!

Cynologist in the classroom with the dog. Dog in class with a dog handler. The work of a dog trainer. Encouraging dogs during training.

How Do I Start a Dog Training Business?

We’re glad you asked! With these 6 steps, you’ll know everything you need to get started and thrive in the pets industry!

Step #1: Get Trained and Internationally-Certified as a Dog Trainer!

As we mentioned earlier, it’s important that you have the proper credentials before starting your dog training business. This means that you’ll need to complete a professional dog trainer course and become certified through an accredited institution, such as QC Pet Studies.

Not only will this ensure that you have the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in your career; it’ll also give your clients peace of mind, knowing that they’re working with a qualified professional.

About QC Pet Studies’ Self-Paced, Online Dog Training Course

There are countless reasons why we recommend this program! Firstly, you have the freedom and convenience of completing it right from the comfort of home (yes, even for the hands-on training). Secondly, you’re giving 2 full years – starting on the date you enroll – to finish the course. However, during that time, you can use as much or as little of those 2 years as you need.

In other words, how soon you graduate is entirely up to YOU!

So, what can you expect to learn in QC’s Dog Training Course? Here are just some of the skills and knowledge you’ll acquire:

  • Breed types and characteristics
  • The guiding principles of dog training
  • Fundamentals of safe training
  • Ethology
  • Stages of development
  • Socialization stages
  • Accurate canine communication
  • Calming signals and fear responses
  • Problem-solving
  • Learning theory and how to apply it
  • Training methods and tools
  • Addressing and correcting unwanted behaviors
  • How to work as a trainer and properly teach pet parents these invaluable skills
  • And more!

Plus, you’ll also have an entire unit devoted to business training! This particular section of the program will teach you about everything that goes into starting (and running) a successful business, such as:

  • How to get your business off the ground
  • Choosing a name for your business and getting it legally registered
  • Requirements and recommendations for business insurance
  • How to develop a business plan
  • The best marketing techniques
  • Selling your services successfully

The final section of your course will even prepare you for the Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) exam from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers! Although this added certification isn’t technically required (as we discussed earlier), most professional dog trainers strive to achieve it all the same.

By taking QC’s Dog Training Course, you’ll not only graduate with an International Dog Training Professional™ ( IDTP™) certification – you’ll be better prepared to ace the CPDT exam and launch your business with that certification on your resume, too!

Ready to get started? Learn even more about QC’s Dog Training Course here and enroll today!

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Step #2: Choose Your Dog Training Niche!

Now that you know what it takes to become a professional dog trainer, it’s time to start thinking about your niche. In other words, what type of training do you want to specialize in?

There are many different niches within the dog training industry – more than we could possibly list here! However, here are just some examples to get your wheels turning:

  • Puppy training
  • Obedience training
  • Agility training
  • Service animal training
  • Therapy dog training
  • Protection/guard dog training

This is by no means an exhaustive list – the options are truly endless when it comes to choosing a specialty for your business. And remember: you don’t have to choose just one! You could easily offer a variety of services to appeal to a wider range of clients.

How to Hone in On Your Niche

The best way to decide which niche is right for you is to ask yourself some questions:

  • Which areas of dog training do I enjoy the most?
  • What are my skills and strengths?
  • What type of clientele do I want to work with?
  • What’s the demand for this particular type of training in my area?

Once you have a good idea of what you want your business to look like, it’s time to move on to the next step…

Step #3: Develop Your Training Program!

Now that you know what type of training you want to offer, it’s time to start developing your program.

Dog in an agility competition set up in a green grassy park

This process will vary depending on your niche. However, there are some key elements that should be included in every dog training program, such as:

  • A thorough evaluation of the dog’s temperament and behaviors
  • An explanation of the trainer’s recommended course of action
  • Individualized attention and correction for each dog
  • A clear explanation of the expected results/goals
  • Regular progress reports for pet parents
  • Ongoing support from the trainer even after the program is complete

If you’re not sure where to start when it comes to developing your training program, don’t worry. This is exactly the sort of stuff you’ll learn in QC’s Dog Training Course!

Step #4: Start Marketing Your Business!

Now that you’ve got the basics down, it’s time to start marketing your business. This is where things can get a little tricky, as there are many different ways to go about it. However, some of the most effective methods include:

  • Creating a professional website, as well as an online presence through social media
  • Developing relationships with local pet businesses, dog groomers, and organizations
  • Running ads in print or online publications
  • Giving presentations or workshops on dog training topics
  • Networking with other professionals in the industry

It’s important to know that there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to marketing. Rather, you’ll need to experiment until you find what works best for you and your business. But with a little effort, you’re sure to start seeing results fairly quickly!

Service dog in training

Step #5: Start Training Dogs!

Now that you’ve got your business off the ground, it’s time to start actually training dogs! This is where the real work begins, but it’s also what makes it all worth it. Seeing a dog learn and grow under your guidance is an incredibly rewarding experience, and one that can’t be matched by anything else.

Some excellent ways that you can begin gaining real-world experience include:

  • Offering free consultations or introductory sessions
  • Providing complimentary training sessions to friends and family in order to start building your portfolio
  • Lending your training expertise to local animal shelters and non-profit organizations

You can also try enticing first-time clients to book their training sessions with you by offering them a free consultation, a referral discount, or any other type of promo service you wish to give them. Our point is, don’t be afraid to get creative and think outside the box. There are many ways to gain experience and build your client base, so don’t be afraid to try something new!

Step #6: Keep Learning and Growing!

As the saying goes: “It’s never too late to teach an old dog new tricks.” Well, the exact same logic should be applied to your dog training career!

As a professional trainer, it’s important to always be learning and growing. After all, the industry is constantly changing. So, you need to be prepared for anything!

Here are just a few ways to continue honing your skills:

  • Attend seminars and workshops
  • Read industry publications
  • Participate in online forums and discussion groups
  • Take courses and workshops from other professionals
  • Shadow a dog trainer for a day

The best way to stay ahead of the curve is to NEVER stop learning. By continuing to expand your knowledge, you’ll be able to offer the highest quality training possible to your clients. And that’s what it’s all about: giving dogs the best chance at success!

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In Conclusion…

Now that you know how to start a dog training business, it’s time to put your skills into action! We hope this article has been helpful and provided some valuable information.

Remember: always do your research before starting any new venture, and consult with an expert if necessary. With a little hard work and determination, you’re sure to be successful!

Start on your path to becoming a certified dog trainer by enrolling with QC Pet Studies today!

How to Become a Dog Trainer: A Step-by-Step Guide

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Dream of a career in professional dog training? We’re here to tell you EXACTLY how to become a dog trainer in less than a year!

Read on as we answer some of the most frequently asked questions pertaining to this career path. Plus, we’ll break down 5 key steps for getting started AND tell you all about QC Pet Studies‘ brand-new Dog Training certification course.

So, on that note, let’s jump right in, shall we?

How Long Does it Take to Become a Dog Trainer?

The length of time it’ll take you to start a career as a dog groomer will ultimately depend on the type of training you choose to get. Some courses will run for a handful of weeks, whereas others can take months.

Typically, though, you’re going to want to look for a slightly longer course. There’s a lot that goes into being a dog trainer – and a program that’s only a few weeks long likely won’t teach you everything you need to know to do the job properly.

We’ll go more in-depth about your educational options a little later in this article!

What Qualifications Do You Need to Be a Dog Trainer?

Here’s the thing: technically, you don’t “need” any type of certification in order to call yourself a dog trainer. However, you’ll be making a BIG mistake if you choose to forego a proper education.

You see, this is the kind of field where a lot of things can go really, really wrong if you aren’t adequately prepared. After all, you’re going to be working with living, breathing creatures – and not all of them are going to be happy about it. While many dogs will be gentle and well-mannered, others may be anxious, scared, or defensive.

If you don’t know what you’re doing, you’ll not only be putting your own safety at risk… You could also be putting the safety of the dogs AND their owners at risk, too. And we know you don’t want that!

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Key Skills Needed for a Career in Dog Training

Obviously, if you want to know how to work as a dog trainer, you’re going to need to know, well, how to train dogs. On paper, that seems like a no-brainer. In reality, however, it’s a bit more complicated than that.

Here’s a handful of examples of just SOME of the knowledge you’ll need to possess:

  • The guiding principles of dog training;
  • Fundamentals of safe training;
  • Ethology;
  • The stages of development, as well as socialization stages;
  • Canine communication;
  • Calming signals and fear responses;
  • Problem solving;
  • Learning theory (and how to apply it);
  • How to work with anxious and/or disobedient dogs, etc.

Furthermore, you’re going to need some of softer skills required for this type of career, too. For example, since you’ll often be working with pet owners, you’ll need to ensure that your people skills are on point. As part of this, you should be an excellent communicator; capable of explaining everything in a way non-dog trainers can understand.

On the flipside, you’ll also need to be good at listening. Each client will be coming to you for a purpose, and with a distinct goal in mind. It’ll be your job to help them achieve this goal as best as possible… and the only way you can do this is by hearing their needs and identifying where the areas of improvement are.

From there, you’ll be able to determine the correct course of action, and help teach them how to put that plan into practice.

Can You Make a Living Being a Dog Trainer?

ABSOLUTELY!

In the beginning of your career, it’ll take time to gain some traction and build your list of clientele. However, so long as you’re passionate about what you do and willing to put in the effort, this can totally become a full-time career… And it can definitely pay the bills, too!

Take QC Pet Studies’ amazing instructor, Kim Cooper, for example. Kim’s been professionally training dogs for the past 35 years, and teaching dog owners how to train their pups for 29 of those years! Her business, Best Friends Dog Training, is located in Ottawa, Canada. Throughout her lucrative career as a dog trainer, Kim has:

  • Certified 4 search and rescue (SAR) dogs to Ontario Provincial Police standards! For reference, only 20 dogs have ever achieved this certification – and Kim is proud to have coached 14 of them, and partner to 4!
  • Gotten certified as a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Canine Search Specialist! This makes Kim 1 of only 2 Canadians to ever achieve this certification.
  • Founded the Ottawa Valley SAR Dog Association
  • Also became the Founding Director of the Ontario SAR Volunteer Association
  • Gotten featured in CBC’s Podcast, “Someone Knows Something”, as well as in National Geographic’s, “Finding Dial”.
  • Earned countless dog training awards!
  • And SO much more!

These are all examples of career goals YOU can achieve, too! Of course, if you wish to focus your career primarily on helping dog owners to train their furry friends, then that’s okay, too!

Either way, one thing’s for sure: with the right drive, you can make this your full-time, long-term job.

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Salary Expectations

It’s important to understand that there’s no “one-size-fits-all” salary for a dog trainer. Your income will depend on:

  • Where you live
  • Local competitors
  • Demand for dog training services in your area
  • Whether you’re booking clients full-time vs. part-time
  • Whether you’re running your own business or working for an established company
  • The efforts you put into marketing, client acquisition/retention, social media, your business website, etc.
  • The types of dog training services you offer, etc.

That said, I can give you some general figures to help you get a better idea of possible salary ranges, depending on your location…

  • United States: Between approx. $14,000 USD and $69,000 USD per year. (Source: ZipRecruiter)
  • Canada: Between approx. $33,000 CAD to $72,000 CAD per year. (Source: Glassdoor)
  • United Kingdom: Between approx. £20,000 GBP to £26,000 GBP per year. (Source: Payscale)
  • Australia: Between approx. $40,000 AUD to $60,000 AUD per year. (Source: Salary Expert)
  • New Zealand: Between approx. $39,000 NZD to $50,000 NZD per year. (Source: Careers.govt.nz)

How to Become a Dog Trainer in 5 Easy Steps

Now that you know what it takes to be a dog trainer, how can you actually become one? Follow these 5 steps and you’ll be well on your way!

Step One: Get Trained and Professional Certified

Okay, now it’s time to circle back to your schooling. Without a doubt, this is the best possible place to start if you want to launch a successful career.

It’s up to YOU to decide whether you wish to pursue your dog training education online or in-person. Keep in mind that in light of the ongoing COVID pandemic, a brick-and-mortar institution might not be the safest environment to be in right now. Furthermore (and in general), in-person schooling is often much more expensive than its online counterpart – and offers way less flexibility for you.

Either way, when conducting your research into the various schooling options at your disposal, we encourage you to be very thorough! In particular, it’s critical that whichever program you decide to go with meets the following criteria:

  • The school in question is properly accredited and recognized (such as with the Better Business Bureau).
  • Moreover, the school’s courses are internationally-recognized – as are the certifications provided upon graduation.
  • The school has a proper business website that contains full course breakdowns, student/graduate testimonials, and correct contact information. Bonus points if the institution is also on social media as well!
  • You’re able to contact the school’s Support Team… and they actually take the time to talk with you and adequately answer your questions!
  • Their dog training program offers a legitimate certification + designation once you graduate.
  • You’ll be getting your money’s worth! This means that the program isn’t simply comprised of multiple choice quizzes and flimsy text material. Instead, the course curriculum should be content-rich AND ensure real-world, hands-on training assignments with actual dogs.
Back view of dog talking to dog friends in video conference. Group of dogs having an online meeting in video call using a laptop. Labradoodle and boxer dog chatting online. Pets using a computer.

QC Pet Studies’ Dog Training Course

Fun fact: QC Pet Studies meets ALL of the above criteria – and then some!

For starters, QC has been a pioneer of online learning since 1984. We’re internationally-recognized and hold a solid A+ ranking with the Better Business Bureau. Additionally, we pride ourselves on our incredible Student Support Team, available 7 days a week and with one goal in mind: to make YOUR student experience the best it can possibly be!

Our brand-new Dog Training Course has been meticulously crafted. We ensure that you’ll learn everything you need to know in order to launch a successful, long-term career in the pets industry. This 8-unit program offers countless textbooks, instructional videos, and hands-on assignments.

Plus, in the final unit of the course, we’ll even help you prepare for the Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) exam. By taking – and passing – this exam, you’ll further your qualifications AND career by adding an additional certification from the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers!

Why You Should Take This Course

On top of everything I’ve just discussed above, there are even more reasons why this is the dog training program you’ve been looking for!

Firstly, it’s 100% self-paced. When you first enroll, you’ll be given 2 full years to complete your course. However, you have complete and total freedom to use as much (or as little) of that time as you need! This means that YOU get to decide how long it’ll take for you to become a dog trainer.

Secondly, we not only offer competitive tuition; we also offer a budget-friendly payment plan. Yes, you can absolutely pay your full tuition upfront. Heck, we’ll even knock $400 OFF your total if you choose to do so. That said, if you’d prefer a slightly cheaper option, you can simply pay a small deposit at the time of enrollment. After that, your balance will be broken up into 18 affordable installments, which you’ll pay off on a monthly basis.

The best part?

Once you graduate, you’ll receive an internationally-recognized International Dog Training Professional™ (IDTP™) certification AND official designation! In turn, you can then add these to your resume, which will be sure to impress clients!

Want to learn even more about QC’s Dog Training Course? Click here for the full details and get started today!

Step Two: Practice, Practice, Practice!

Dog training is one of those fields where the more real-world experience you get, the better. And while your dog training course with QC Pet Studies will help you dip your toes in the water, you shouldn’t go into your career thinking that that’ll be enough.

On the contrary, you’ll NEVER be able to get enough experience!

So, as much as possible, practice all those invaluable skills you’ve learned. In the beginning of your career, it may be a bit tricky to attract legit, paying clients. As such, one thing we strongly recommend is maximizing your personal network. If you have any friends or family who could use some help training their dog(s), offer your services for free.

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Sure, you won’t get paid for these jobs. But the experience you’ll get from them will be just as beneficial! Not only will you get the opportunity to hone your skill-set, you’ll be able to start developing your professional portfolio.

Moreover, your friends and family can then provide you with positive testimonials. These reviews on your website and social media will be worth their weight in gold!

Step Three: Decide On Your Career Path

If you want to be successful as a dog trainer, it’ll benefit you to approach your career with a clear idea of what you want it to look like. So, before you go trying to bite off more than you can chew, sit down first and map out your trajectory.

For instance, would you prefer to join an existing dog training company, or would you like to start your own business? Do you want to do this full-time, or as a side job? Where would you like to see your career as a dog trainer in a year from now? What about in 3 years, 5 years, and beyond?

Furthermore, if you want to launch your own business, consider the following questions:

  • What would you like to name your business, and what will you need to do in order to get that name registered?
  • What do you want your brand to be?
  • Who will be your target audience/ideal clientele?
  • What dog training services do you want to offer?
  • Would you prefer to offer your services in-person, virtually, or a combination of both?
  • Do you want to offer one-on-one training classes? How about group lessons?
  • Are you interested in specializing in certain types of dogs (e.g. dogs with behavioral issues, dogs with special needs, dogs with anxiety, etc.) or would you like to help train ALL types of dogs?
  • How much effort are you willing to put into your social media presence?
  • Furthermore, what about your online marketing?

Remember: the better prepared you are, the likelier you’ll be to become successful!

Step Four: Market Your Dog Training Services

If you get hired by an existing company, chances are, they’ll have someone already in charge of marketing. For this reason, I’m going to focus here on some tips and tricks for marketing your own business. After all, if you decide to go this route, it’ll be up to YOU to get your name out there!

And make no mistake, marketing your business efficiently will be FUNDAMENTAL to your success!

In-Person Marketing

A good place to begin your marketing efforts is to start local. Build up the buzz for your business in your own area, before you trying conquering the entire world. Luckily, there are all sorts of ways you can market yourself in-person:

  • Hang up business fliers around town.
  • Get in touch with your fellow professionals (e.g. pet stores, dog groomers, dog walkers, animal rescues, veterinarians, etc.) and see if they’d be willing to help promote your business.
  • See if you can get an ad for your dog training business printed in the local newspaper, mentioned on local radio stations, etc.
  • Get involved in local events and see if you can provide your services there.
  • Volunteer your time and skill-set to charities, not-for-profits, human societies, animal shelters, etc.
Professional dog training class

Online Marketing

When it comes to business-savvy marketing strategies, never forget the value of the digital world as well! We all live online nowadays, so a HUGE portion of your marketing should be done via the internet.

Not sure what’s at your disposal?

Here are just some of the ways you can market yourself online:

  • Get active on popular social media sites, such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, TikTok, YouTube, and LinkedIn.
  • Create a professional website for your business.
  • Start your very own blog and post high-quality, SEO-friendly content.
  • Invest in paid ads, etc.

Word-Of-Mouth Referrals

Word-of-mouth will always have its place in the world of business marketing. In some cases, it can be the most effective way of attracting new, long-lasting clients. After all, when a trusted individual recommends you to their own friends, family, colleagues, etc., those people are more inclined to look into your business and give you a try.

With that in mind, don’t be afraid to ask your inner circle to recommend you to others. Chances are, they’ll be more than happy to help. Additionally, whenever you work with a new client, there’s no harm in asking them to refer you to anyone they know who might be in need of a professional dog trainer.

Just be sure to use your best discretion with this. Obviously, if the experience didn’t go the way you planned and/or they seemed unsatisfied, it wouldn’t be the wisest move to ask them for a referral. However, if a client seems happy with the services you’ve provided, they’ll probably be more than willing to rave about you!

Step Five: Network with Shelters, Pet Stores, and Breeders

In general, networking will be one of your BEST friends as you become a dog trainer. Plus, it’ll serve you well throughout the entirety of your career.

The more people on the pets industry that you get to know (and establish a positive reputation with), the likelier you’ll be to attract clientele. This is because your network can help refer customers your way, make you aware of job opportunities you might not have otherwise known about, etc.

As such, always be willing to proactively network with anyone and EVERYONE you can within the industry. Yes, this even means fellow dog trainers. Although they can be considered your “competition”, they’re also your allies.

Other experts you should definitely network with include animal shelters, pet stores, and dog breeders. Firstly, your training services could prove useful for their own operations. For instance, by lending your expertise to animal shelters, you can potentially increase the chances of those dogs getting adopted.

On the other hand, local pet stores might be in need of someone to help run training programs offered by their company. This could be a chance for you to hire yourself out as a contract expert!

Not to mention, networking with these specific businesses can also generate even more client referrals for you. Take dog breeders, for instance. Every individual who purchases a pup from them can be one new client they refer to you, to help these new dog owners get their puppy properly trained.

Our point is: get out there and build your network. It’s never too early to start that important step. One way or another, your network WILL help you advance your career at some point. That much we can guarantee.

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Now that you know how to become a dog trainer, it’s time to get started! Enroll with QC Pet Studies today!

Dog Training Quiz: Do YOU Know Your Calming Signals?

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Dream of a career in professional dog training? Then you’re going to need to understand what’s known as “calming signals”!

Want to see where you’re knowledge is currently at? Take this quiz and see how you do!

How did you do on this dog training quiz? Share your results in the comments below!

New Course Alert: QC Pet Studies’ Upcoming Dog Training Course!

Keep an eye out, because, in the near future, QC Pet Studies will be launching a brand-new course all about professional dog training!

Whether you want some tips and tricks to train your own dog, or you’d like to pursue a career where you help other dog owners, this program will have everything you need to achieve your goals (and then some)! The best part? Once you graduate, you’ll earn an internationally recognized certification to add to your resume. As a result, your clients can trust that you’ve been properly educated and are truly the best of the best!

Plus, if you’re already a certified dog groomer, you can add training services to your existing business. This means you’ll be able to attract even more clients, boost your income, and elevate your career to the next level!

So, make sure you stay tuned because this exciting new course is coming soon!

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Benefits of Training with QC Pet Studies

QC Pet Studies proudly holds an A+ ranking with the Better Business Bureau. Moreover, we’re a subsidiary of QC Career School: a pioneer of distance learning since 1984. Our self-paced, online environment provides complete and total freedom to pursue your training at the convenience of your own schedule, from the comfort of home!

Want to learn even more about QC Pet Studies?

Here are some useful resources we recommend checking out:

Before getting your dog training certification, start your career by getting trained and certified as a groomer!

Enroll with QC Pet Studies today and be ready to book your first client in less than a year!